Why Freelancing is a Dirty Word for Entrepreneurs

Freelancing. It’s a dirty word according to those entrepreneurs (ahem, Seth Godin) who purport that we should either become a freelancer or invest our time in building our business. Don’t get me wrong. I am a raving fan of Seth Godin’s, but I do think there’s a middle ground for those in the early stages of building our businesses while supporting our families.  

What do you think?

 

Authenticity characterizes everything I write about for the Mindi Zone Project. It’s why I wanted to talk about the guilt that many of us encounter when trying to make ends meet while we are constructing lifestyle businesses.

 

If you are on my mailing list—it’s where you get the scoop about our latest family adventures and lessons learned—then, you know that our family is cutting our budget IN HALF this month. Radical change, which we hope will yield dramatic results.

 

Because of this challenge, I needed to immediately boost my income contribution to the family. Yes, this would take away time from my business, but it had to be done.

 

I had two immediate options.

 

Option One: Apply for remote jobs within my marketing niche. I did my “apply-for-a-job-a-day-challenge” with solid results for 30 days. But, as much as I enjoy reading job descriptions—yes, I really do—I do not like being tied down to an employer. I lack a sense of company loyalty. These jobs are challenging to find and typically require a 9-5 commitment. Not ideal when you have a 10-week-old baby.

 

Option Two: Start freelancing. I checked out Elance for freelance marketing opportunities out of curiosity. When I read the projects, I felt a familiar stir. They excited my marketing mind. They inspired my creativity. I had to start submitting proposals. I actually won the first proposal I submitted. I was hooked! Within five days, I picked up a total of three uber-exciting projects. If you’re curious, you can check out my Elance profile here.

 

What I like about Elance is that most of the jobs I’ve seen revolve around helping entrepreneurs and small businesses. Those are two causes I believe in. Therefore, this type of work aligns with my value system. Eureka! I can follow my own advice to align my values with my work.

 

Now, I am actively freelancing, which takes time away from building my business here. True-blue entrepreneurs would tell me that I am sacrificing the long-term potential of the Mindi Zone Project in exchange for some short-term cash. And, maybe they are right.

 

But, you know what? I don’t care. I’m doing what is best for my family right now, and I am having a heck of a lot of fun freelancing! Let those Godin-ites judge me, if they want to.

 

Your Turn: Have you ever felt torn between freelancing and starting your own business? What did you do about it?